Giornea

A lady would not go out in just her gamurra and there were many options of over dress for her to wear. A gironea is one of these options and was very popular in florence. They’re also very simply to make and can be made with very little fabric. You can read about one way to construct them here. You can also see the glossary page here.

1486-90 Domenico Ghirlandaio Birth of St John the Baptist detail

They were sleeveless, open down the sides and could be open down the front, which allowed the gamurra to show through. When made of lightweight fabric this made them cool in the warmer weather though young ladies especially would line them with fur to wear in the cooler weather. Sometimes these linings were removable, making the gironea suitable for both summer and winter wear.

My burgundy gamurra is made of cotton velveteen and lined in gold silk.

burgundygiorneaamal

My blue gamurra is inspired by this image

1486_ghirl_dress

It is sewn up the front and left open at the sides.

cDSCN4188 DSC_0685 (2)

My yellow “Giovanna Tornabuoni” giornea is made of reproduction silk and lined in cotton velveteen. It is open up the front seam. I drafted a new pattern for this giornea and I prefer the way it hangs.

Yellow Giornea from Cathelina’s wardrobe based on the paintings of Giovanna Tornabuoni.

Yellow Giornea from Cathelina’s wardrobe based on the paintings of Giovanna Tornabuoni.

Yellow Giornea from Cathelina’s wardrobe based on the paintings of Giovanna Tornabuoni.

Yellow Giornea from Cathelina’s wardrobe based on the paintings of Giovanna Tornabuoni.

Yellow Giornea from Cathelina’s wardrobe based on the paintings of Giovanna Tornabuoni.

Yellow Giornea from Cathelina’s wardrobe based on the paintings of Giovanna Tornabuoni.

This Giornea was based on the following paintings.

1485-1590 Domenico Ghirlandaio Visitation detail

1488 ghirlandaio_tornabuoni

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11 thoughts on “Giornea

  1. Pingback: Constructing a Giornea | Cathelina di Alessandri

  2. Pingback: Giornea | Cathelina di Alessandri

  3. Pingback: Constructing a Giornea | Cathelina di Alessandri

  4. Hi! Your website is an inspiration for me; and through it I have found the period of clothes that I love for what I hope will be my persona in the SCA. I am curious if you could provide more information on the construction of this garment? It would help me so much! Thank you!

  5. Hello, Cathelina! Congratulations for your costumes! They are perfect! I would like to know how you reproduced the fabric of Giovanna Tornabuoni’s giornea. Thank you for the answer. Best regards.
    Sonia (Naples-Italy)

  6. I’m making a giornea so that a whole group can wear the same style. I’m trying to find information on the second pattern you used that draped much better. Am I missing it?

    • Hi Wendy, you’re not missing it, I just packed the pattern I drafted away and haven’t had a chance to unpack it and do a writeup. I draped the pattern on my dress dummy and rather than the pieces being shaped like a trapezoid with one straight side and one slanty, both sides are slanty, more like the letter A.

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